The best of Cartoon Porn in the Internet

The internet is good for porn. Until a couple of years ago this was one of the strongest convictions of those who knew the Net only superficially. But it was not a totally wrong belief, because in fact the internet is a perfect environment to find pornographic material of all kinds, able to satisfy any taste the surfer may have in terms of sex. But if the surfer goes in search of erotic or pornographic comics, then his search becomes much more difficult. Actually, on the internet you can find hundreds maybe thousands of sites that publish erotic illustrations (very often drawn in manga style), and with file exchange software it is not difficult to find erotic cartoons, but comics are one thing different. In the sea magnum of the internet there are only three sites, all three for a fee, which for the quality of their comics are worth mentioning in this article, the last of which is particularly interesting.

The US Site and More

Cartoon Valley is a US site specializing in making erotic versions of the most famous Hollywood cartoons. It could somehow be said to be the 21st century version of the Tijuana Biblefrom the 1930s. In the pages of Cartoon Valley you can find both animated films and real comics, and you can follow the sexual evolutions of people like Alice in Wonderland, Beauty and the Beast, Roger and Jessica Rabbit, Aladdin and Tinker in (the fairy of the fairy tale of Peter Pan), all obviously drawn in a manner faithful to how we saw them on the big screen. However, there is no shortage of non-Disney animation characters, such as the Winx and the Incredibles, but also those of superhero comics, such as Batman and Spider-Man. The cartoon porn goes alongside.

Sex Fantasy is a completely different story

The playful and colorful atmospheres of Cartoon Valley leave room for comics (downloadable in PDF version) of the sadomasochistic genre, which mostly portray young women kidnapped and tortured against the backdrop of the most diverse places and narrative genres. In the vast Fantasy catalog, which also includes novels and an animated film, there are three products that deserve special mention: Gary Roberts’ Star Fuckers, Wayne Wine’s Night Stalker and Cagri’s Avenger.

  • The first takes up again the concept of the Tijuana Bibleto tell the kidnapping of movie and music stars like Jessica Alba or Britney Spears; the second is a saga in which a frustrated bank employee disguises himself as a superhero to kidnap the women who provoked him during the day; the third tells the clash between a detective who disguises himself as a superhero to capture his unfaithful wives and a journalist who disguises himself as a superhero to try to stop him.

The Sites for You

The third site is more complex than the first two and, while still remaining in the field of bondage and fetish, it deserves a few more words because of the initiatives it presents. Strap And Strip offers its subscribers the publication of a new comic story every month, obviously ranging from the most diverse themes and genres. Being an Italian site it publishes comics made by young Italian authors, but their stories have the particularity of always being without dialogue or almost, which is something far from easy to do effectively, even in erotic comics. In addition to comic stories, the site also offers a series of illustrated stories, and alongside the electronic publication it also publishes its works in the publishing market thanks to P&V Comics.

Conclusion

The real plus of Strap And Stip, however, is represented by the re-release (only on the site) of some of the most famous sexy-comics of the 70s and 80s. You can thus (re) read the adventures of Angelica, Cosmine, Isabella, Jolanda de Almaviva, Jungla, Lucifera, Vartan, Walalla and other heroines of the golden age of Italian erotic comics, as well as anthological series such as Oltretomba, Sbarre and Blue stories and series that instead saw men as protagonists, such as Zordon or the cult Goldrake. An excellent opportunity, in short, to find stories and characters that were often of good quality regardless of the genre they faced.

Eugene M. Woodward